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Qatar 2022 World Cup stadia take shape

With just over four years to go to the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar, progress is being made at all the tournament’s venues.

Over the past 12 months the first 2022 FIFA World Cup stadium to be completed opened its doors to the public, another two designs were revealed and visible advancements were made at every site.

Khalifa International Stadium became the first proposed 2022 FIFA World Cup tournament venue to open in May this year.

The 40,000 capacity stadium was officially opened by His Highness, The Emir, Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, ahead of the Emir Cup final between Al Sadd and Al Rayyan.

Also in 2017, the stadium became the first venue in the world to officially receive the 4-star Global Sustainability Assessment System certification. The stadium, which will host matches up to the quarter-finals stage in 2022, is currently being prepared to host the 2019 World Athletics Championships.

Work at Al Wakrah Stadium, which was designed by the late Zaha Hadid, continues apace. Bespoke roof pillars have been installed, while concrete pouring has been completed. The 40,000 capacity stadium, which will host matches up to the quarter-finals stage in 2022, is due to open in 2018.

The roof is currently being installed at Al Bayt Stadium-Al Khor City – a 60,000 capacity venue which will host matches up to the semi-finals stage in 2022.

The stadium also reached a sustainability milestone in 2017 after receiving top marks in the Global Sustainability Assessment System’s culture and heritage section. Al Bayt Stadium-Al Khor City is due to be completed by the end of 2018.

Workers at the Al Rayyan Stadium construction site recently reached 5 million man hours without suffering a lost-time accident. Also in 2017, the stadium seating design was revealed.

Meanwhile, on-site, sub and substructure works are in progress and precinct infrastructure works have begun. Due to be completed in 2019, the 40,000 capacity venue will host matches up to the quarter-finals stage in 2022.

Progress continues to be made at the ‘Diamond in the Desert’ – Qatar Foundation Stadium. More than 80% of concrete has been poured at the construction site in Education City. Within the precinct, the golf course has been completed and is due to open in 2019. Designed by Fenwick Iribarren Architects, Qatar Foundation will have a capacity of 40,000 and host matches up to the quarter-finals stage in 2022.

The proposed design for Al Thumama Stadium was revealed in August. Inspired by the gahfiya headdress worn by men across the region, the design has captured the imagination of millions.

Due to open in 2020, Al Thumama Stadium will have a capacity of 40,000 and host matches up to the quarter-finals stage.

The innovative design for Ras Abu Aboud Stadium, the first fully demountable FIFA World Cup tournament venue, was unveiled in November. Designed by Fenwick Iribarren Architects, this 40,000 capacity stadium will be built using the shipping containers which transported materials for its construction.

Overlooking the stunning Doha Corniche and West Bay skyline, Ras Abu Aboud Stadium will host matches up to the quarter-finals stage in 2022.

Early works are continuing at the Lusail Stadium site, 15km north of Doha.

A Qatar-China joint venture (HBK Contracting Company and China Railway Construction Corporation) was chosen last year as the main contractor for the stadium.

Due to open in 2020, Lusail Stadium will host the 2022 FIFA World Cup final, opening game and matches throughout the tournament. The design for Lusail Stadium is due to be unveiled in early 2018.

@PanStadiaArena